Coffe

Discover the wonderful cafeteria that we put at your disposal

For years now, almost since we opened the hotel, Las Golondrinas has enjoyed the services of an excellent friend whose presence makes both the work of the staff and the experience of the guests more enjoyable. Her name is Rosi, and she is from San Juan Chapultepec in the Central Valley. We don't know if all the girls from there are like Rosi, but if they are, we can say that they are cheerful, modest, responsible and funny.

Rosi is in charge of maintaining the kitchen like the Palace of Versailles: think of its mirrors as the pots and pans, competing in brilliance with the midday sun. It's at midday that Rosi goes shopping for the next day. She uses a shopping cart that she arranges in a unique way to make sure the groceries are not mistreated; tomatoes, papayas, mangos, bananas and cheese are to suffer no bruises. She pads the sides of the cart with egg cartons to protect all her purchases. I asked her once why she didn't use a cloth shopping bag, and her response was direct and clear: "It doesn't protect the same."

Rosi does her shopping in the Mercado Sánchez Pascuas, which is about five blocks north of the hotel. The vendors take care of her well, as they've known her for so long. They know Rosi's requirements and don't try to pass off any fruit that's past its time or any salty cheese. They know that the next day they would have to deal with an angry Rosi and replace the faulty groceries, if they are not to lose a good customer.

The kitchen is located by the third courtyard of the hotel, and there among bougainvillea, flower pots and plants you will find six tables for guests to share, four large ones and two small. Breakfast starts at 8 a.m., so Rosi arrives at 7:30 to turn on the stove and get the water boiling. With the help of Tere, Aurora or Arelí, she takes all the fruit from the refrigerator and starts chopping.

The kitchen is spacious and high-ceilinged. If you take a look inside, you can admire a huge picture painted by the master C. Nieto in 1973—a disciple of Diego Rivera. The painting shows three women: two in traditional clothing and the lady of the house in a long turquoise dress. One of the young women is patting out tortillas by hand and the other is plucking a hen. The lady is tasting the food and one can imagine the conversation about the meal—“will everything be ready on time?” Through a window lies a field where horses graze, and in the distance you can see a church.

We hope that you will enjoy our labyrinth of colors and flavors that address all your five senses. Welcome!